The NASIG Program Planning Committee Announcement for Vision Speakers

The Program Planning Committee is looking forward to seeing you in Buffalo. We are excited about the program for the upcoming conference. Here’s our exciting line up of vision speakers:

  • Megan Oakleaf : Megan Oakleaf is an Associate Professor of Library and Information Science in the iSchool at Syracuse University.  She is the author of the Value of Academic Libraries Comprehensive Review and Report and has earned recognition and awards for articles published in top library and information science journals. Her research areas include outcomes assessment, evidence-based decision making, information literacy instruction, and academic library impact and value.
  •  Siva Vaidhyanathan: Siva Vaidhyanathan is a cultural historian and media scholar, and is currently the Robertson Professor in Media Studies at the University of Virginia. From 1999 through the summer of 2007 he worked in the Department of Culture and Communication at New York University. Vaidhyanathan is a frequent contributor on media and cultural issues in various periodicals including the Chronicle of Higher Education, New York Times Magazine, The Nation, and Salon.com, and he maintains a blog. His books include: Copyrights and Copywrongs: The Rise of Intellectual Property and How It Threatens Creativity, The Anarchist in the Library: How the Clash Between Freedom and Control Is Hacking the Real World and Crashing the System, Rewiring the Nation: The Place of Technology in American Studies, co-edited with Carolyn de la Peña, The Googlization of Everything — and Why We Should Worry.
  •  Dr. Bryan Alexander: Bryan Alexander is senior fellow at the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE). He researches, writes, and speaks about emerging trends in the integration of inquiry, pedagogy, and technology and their potential application to liberal arts contexts. Dr. Alexander’s current research interests include emerging pedagogical forms enabled by mobile technologies, learning processes and outcomes associated with immersive environments (as in gaming and augmented reality), the rise of digital humanities, the transformation of scholarly communication, and digital storytelling,
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